6th Grade Social Studies Unit

1. Wonders of the World

2. Essential Questions:              

3. Primary Content Area: Social Studies

4. Grade Level:  6

5. Duration: Four to Six Weeks

6. Description of Unit: The seven wonders of the world are objects that were built between 3000 B.C. and 476 A.D. Only one still exists, but all were considered wonders because of the amazing size or engineering feat it took to produce them. There are many wonders of the ancient world that are not on that list which are also equally amazing, as well as modern wonders. They all reflect the culture, beliefs, values, and technology of the people who built them, as well as the environmental constraints due to the geographical features of the area or the resources.

   This unit explores ancient culture through research of the wonders of the world. After an introduction to the Ancient Wonders of the World (through viewing video and teacher sharing books with them) students should have a general overview of the most prominent wonders of the world. They begin to research a wonder they are interested in, as part of the class project

- Tour of the Ancient World. The tour is a series of displays which the children present and explain to the class. featuring the ancient wonders of the world, and Forgotten Wonders of the World. Students may work with partners, or teams of up to four. Students may select modern wonders if they are using them along with an ancient wonder to compare them.

Books to use in presenting background include:

Ancient Wonders, by Tim Wood

The Seven wonders of the World by Kenneth McLeish

Great Wonders of the World by Russell Ash Wonders of the World by Marc Bergen

Some videos to use:

Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, Questar Studios, April 30, 2002. ASIN: 6301687620.

The Seven Wonders of the World - Vol. 1, by Artisan Studio. June 27, 2000 ASIN: 0784015139.

Seven Wonders of Ancient World (2003), directed by Rolf Forsberg. Questar Studios. August 20, 2002 ASIN: B00006LPDB. Reader's Digest - Great Wonders & Splendors of the World, Questar Studios, March 9, 2004.  ASIN: B0001MZ6YM. Lists of the wonders:

Ancient Wonders:

Pyramids of Egypt at Giza

Hanging Gardens of Babylon

Temple of Artemis at Ephesus

Statue of Zeus (Olympia, Greece)

Mausoleum at Halicarnassus

Colossus of Rhodes

Lighthouse of Alexandria

Forgotten wonders:

Temples of Abu Simbel (Egypt)

Angkor Wat Temple (Cambodia)

Borobudur Shrine (Java, Indonesia)

Colosseum (Rome)

Great Wall of China

Machu Picchu (Peru)

Easter Island Statues

Parthenon (Athens)

Petra (Jordan)

Stonehenge (England)

Taj Mahal (Agra, India)

Great Sphinx (Egypt)

Hagia Sophia (Turkey)

Palace of Versailles (France)

Sistine Chapel (Rome)

Arc de Triomphe (Paris)

Chichen Itza (Mexico)

 

Students do general research to get  background knowledge about the Wonders they have selected.

They will look for location, surroundings, and history surrounding the object, then students decide what kind of a presentation they will do to tell about their wonder. (They may build models, dioramas, or make a computer slide show, etc.)

They then decide if the information they have collected is enough or if they need more, and what materials they need to do their project. They are given time to do further research in the library and online.

The class meets to discuss what each team or student is planning to present, and how this will impact the overall show the class is putting together.

Students share and take comments in a whole group setting.

Over four weeks, students use the library, classroom computers (internet research), and computer lab (use online resources such as World Book Online, Encyclopedia Britannica Online, and EBSCO).

They work in class and at home to complete products such as displays, models, videos, and computerized slide shows.

The classroom teacher, technology coordinator, librarian, teacher’s aide, and possible parent volunteers assist groups as they develop their projects

Ultimately, the class produces an ancient history exhibit to be displayed in the cafeteria (science fair style). The entire school and parents are invited to the tour, and students give mini presentations at their displays to explain their wonder and answer questions that the viewers may have.

The purpose is to help students develop research and presentation skills and to be able to describe how a monument built by a society reflects the resources, beliefs, technology and religion of it’s people.

7. Social Studies Content standards:

Standard 3: HISTORY: Historical Inquiry—Students use the tools and methods of historians to transform learning from memorizing historical data to “doing history.”

Benchmarks

6.3.1 Ancient Societies, 3000 B.C.E. to 500 B.C.E.- Examine written and physical evidence from ancient societies in Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indus River Valley, and the Yellow River Valley. 

6.3.3 Classical Societies, 500 B.C.E to 500 C.E.- Compare classical societies, including China during the reign of Han Wudi; Maurya India under Ashoka; Greek city-states under Pericles; and the Roman Empire under Augustus .

Standard 1: HISTORY: Change, Continuity, Causality—Students employ chronology to understand change and/or continuity and cause and/or effect in history.

6.1.1 Causes And Effects in History- Define causal relationships in historical chronologies. 8. Information literacy standards directly addressed:

Standard 1:  Accesses information efficiently and

effectively.

1.  Understands the need for information.

2. Knows that in order to make decisions, accurate information is needed.

   

3. Identify and use a range of information sources.

4. Knows how to access information from a variety of sources – print, nonprint and electronic.

   

5. Knows how the library media center is arranged,how to locate materials using the catalog, and how to retrieve information from print, nonprint and electronic materials in order to solve a problem or answer a question.

 

 

Standard 2: Evaluates information critically and

competently.

1.  Makes distinctions between fact, fiction and biased information.

2. Determines accuracy and credibility of authorship and

    content of a document.

3. Determines relevancy of information to his/her needs

Standard 3: Uses information accurately and

creatively.

Organize the information in a manner that meets the need of the assignment or problem.

Assimilate new information into his/her existing knowledge.

Know how to use the information to communicate ideas.

9. Students are assessed using Hawaii Content and Performance Standards rubrics for    the standards benchmarks listed above, And Teacher made checklist for the Information literacy standards.

10. Assessment methods- student research logs. Students record research and daily progress in research logs (journals). Teacher and librarian read daily entries and provide feedback in the form of comments in the journals. Interview- Librarian and teacher interview groups during work or research time to monitor their progress, and provide assistance or guidance to the groups.

At this time, students also assess their own progress using a checklist of inquiry process steps, and the rubrics provided by HCPS III (notes are also taken by teacher). Students use self-assessment checklists throughout the project. The checklists are based on the benchmark rubrics. Peer evaluations are given as students view the final projects

Wonders of The World Grade 6

Social Studies Unit

Teacher Made Rubrics

 

LIS Standards

Exceeds

Proficient

Novice

Standard 1: Accesses information efficiently and effectively.

  • Identifies need for information and generates relevant questions for research.
  • Seeks accurate information on the topic.
  • Identifies and uses a range of information sources.
  • Accesses information from a variety of sources – print, nonprint and electronic.
  • Effectively locates and retrieves information in the library media center using the OPAC in order to solve a problem or answer a question.

  1. Identifies need for information.
  2. Seeks general information on the topic.
  3. Identifies and uses at least three different information sources.
  4. Accesses information from print, and electronic sources.
  5.  Locates and retrieves information on the topic in the library media center.

  1. Recognizes a need for information.
  2. Seeks general information on the topic.
  3. Identifies an information source.
  4. Seeks information from print, and electronic sources with help.
  5. Locates and retrieves information on the topic in the library media center with assistance.

 

Standard 2: Evaluates information critically and Competently.

  1. Makes distinctions between fact, fiction and biased information when selecting sources to use.
  2. Determines accuracy and credibility of authorship and content of a document before using it as a source.
  3. Selects information which is important to the topic and which addresses the essential questions.

  1. Makes distinctions between fact, and fiction when selecting sources to use.
  2. Examines credibility of authorship and content of a document before using the information.
  3. Selects information which is interesting and which relates to the topic.

  1. Seeks facts from teacher or librarian recommended sources.
  2. Selects random or trivial facts.

Standard 3: Uses information accurately and

creatively

  1. Organizes the information in a manner that effectively meets the need of the assignment or problem, and addresses the essential questions.
  2. Assimilates new information into his/her existing knowledge.
  3. Know how to effectively use the information to accurately communicate important ideas and relevant information about the topic’.

  1. Presents the information in an organized manner that addresses the essential questions.
  2.  Incorporates new information into his/her existing knowledge.
  3. Uses information accurately to communicate basic information about the topic.

  1. Presents random information about the topic.
  2.  Relies mostly on his/her existing knowledge of the topic.
  3. Essential question is not addressed in a meaningful way.

Created by Mary Braffet and Sara Strickland Spring 2007